Pumpkin Shaped Buns

Pumpkin Shaped Buns // Mono + Co

Fall or not, pumpkin puree is a great addition to bread recipes throughout the year as they make loaves and buns pillowy soft naturally.  I will spare my family from another bread loaf for breakfast and shape these buns into tiny pumpkin lookalikes by using butcher twine/cooking string from Daiso to section the ball dough into 8 sections.  Once the dough balls expand through the strings, they will form pumpkin shaped buns after baking.  Pity these strings cannot be reused since bread pieces got stuck onto them during the rising and baking stage.  I had to discard them after making these buns.

Pumpkin Shaped Buns // Mono + Co

The extremely warm room temperature lately made the dough rise faster than usual, took it just 40 minutes for the first rise and 20 minutes for final proof.  The higher room temperature in my kitchen also seemed to make the dough wetter than usual after adding chilled butter cubes and didn’t look like it was reaching anything closer to window pane stage after 15 minutes of kneading.  I tried lowering the dough temperature by placing ice packs around the mixing bowl while it was running.  I previously tried with a towel soaked with ice water and it worked out beautifully; the dough reached window pane stage in no time.  But these reusable ice backs are even more convenient.

Though the ice packs can be easily made with a ziplock bag and water, I have quite a number of these reusable ice packs stashed inside my freezer.  Alway frozen, always ready.  They are super handy when packing cold food or shopping for chiller items, and unlike the homemade ones, these won’t leak.

Pumpkin Shaped Buns // Mono + Co Pumpkin Shaped Buns // Mono + Co Pumpkin Shaped Buns // Mono + Co Pumpkin Shaped Buns // Mono + Co

To serve, remove the strings carefully without tearing the soft buns apart.  I stick a clove on top of each bun to make them look even more like pumpkins.

Pumpkin Shaped Buns // Mono + Co Pumpkin Shaped Buns // Mono + Co

I also used ready made red bean paste from Daiso as fillings but you can home make some pumpkin fillings like this for more festive cheer.

 


Pumpkin Shaped Buns

recipe yields 8 buns

200g plain flour
80g wholemeal flour
1 teaspoon instant dry yeast
2 tablespoons raw sugar
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
120g steamed pumpkin, pureed
1/2 beaten egg**
2 tablespoons milk powder ***
50g water
20g cold butter, cubed
red bean paste as filling
8 cloves, for garnish

** I usually add 1 whole beaten egg (70g without shells), but the warm weather made it difficult to work with a wet dough, so I added just half of the beaten egg.  If you prefer to add the entire egg to save the trouble of not knowing what to do with the other half (I usually add more eggs and cook omelette), adjust the water added subsequently accordingly.

*** I am in the midst of replacing our household fresh milk consumption with milk powder in order to cut own on the number of plastic bottles and milk cartons we are sending to the recycling bin weekly.  If you don’t have milk powder, simply omit it and replace water with fresh milk.  I wouldn’t recommend buying a bag of dry milk powder just to use 2 tablespoons if you already have fresh milk at home.

In a mixer bowl, combine all the dry ingredients: plain flour, wholemeal flour, instant yeast, raw sugar, salt, and milk powder, into a uniform mixture.  Add pumpkin puree, beaten egg and start the mixer knead with a dough hook attachment on its lowest speed (KA 1).  Add water slowly and stop the mixer when all the ingredients come into a rough ball, you might need lesser water than the amount stated in the recipe, depending on the moisture level of the pumpkin puree, watch the dough and adjust accordingly.  Let the dough rest for 15 minutes.

After resting the dough for 15 minutes, start the mixer running on its lowest speed again to knead the dough for 1 minute, before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead until the dough reaches window pane stage, this is when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic, and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.  Remove the bowl from mixer, cover and bulk rise for 40 to 60 minutes.

To test if the dough is ready to be shaped, poke a hole in the center with a floured finger, the dent should not bounce back if the bulk rise is completed.  Once the dough is ready, punch down the dough to deflate it, and transfer it to a clean work top.

Divide the dough into 8 equal parts.  Roll each portion into a ball, flatten it and place a tablespoon of red bean paste in the center. Wrap up the filling with the dough, seal it tighly shape it into a ball.

With seam side facing downwards, tie a long string across the bun like this and place it on baking tray lined with parchment paper.  Let this sit in a draft-free place to rise for another 20 minutes.

Bake in a preheated oven at 160C for 20 minutes.  Remove the bread from the pan immediately after baking, and let it cool on a rack completely.  Remove string, place a clove on top of each bun as decoration before serving.

Store in a covered container if not consumed immediately, to keep the crumbs from drying out.

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Browned Banana Belgian Waffles

Browned Banana Belgian Waffles // Mono + Co

I finally got myself a Belgium waffle maker after taking an awfully long time to consider.  Since I have a habit of “depreciating” my appliance purchases to $1 per use, I will need to make waffles 152 times for this latest splurge. My husband says I am crazy since I don’t even eat store-made waffles that often.  But that’s only because waffles are costly at cafes.  I have always secretly wanted my ice-cream orders to be served with crispy-edged waffles, but I ended up choosing an extra or two scoops of ice-cream over getting the waffle for almost the same price.

Browned Banana Belgian Waffles // Mono + Co

This is waffles batch #02 of 152.  The first batch was prepared the day before with a long time favorite recipe from here.  I am not completely filling up the bottom half of the waffle maker yet for the first few trials in case the batter overflows during cooking.  Taking my time to know my waffle maker better as cleaning will be a huge issue since the waffle plates are not removable for washing under the tap.  I always take pride in my ability to keep my appliances staying in mint condition and my cleaning trick is really simple: baking soda.  So in case, I regret this purchase after waffle batch #10, at least I can resell it as a second-hand looking brand new.

Browned Banana Belgian Waffles // Mono + Co

This batch of waffles is made with browned bananas after I accidentally “suffocated” them in my shopping bag and they started to turn black all under 3 hours.  Usually I would clear these the fastest way by making milk shakes.  This time, I blended them with milk to make batter for waffles.


Banana Belgium Waffle

adapted from here
1 3/4 cup plain flour
1/4 cup corn starch
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
2 eggs
2 very ripe bananas
1 1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup rice brand oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
softened butter,for greasing waffle iron before making each waffle
raw honey, for serving

** I omitted 2 tablespoons of sugar from the original recipe as I serve the waffles with honey. They will be quite bland on its own, so if you prefer your waffles to be sweet tasting, go ahead and add sugar to the batter recipe.

Blend chopped bananas with milk until smooth to make banana flavored milk.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk all the ingredients together to form a smooth batter.  Add 1 or 2 heap teaspoon of plain flour if the batter is too watery due to the addition of ripened banana.

Preheat waffle maker.

Grease the waffle iron generously with butter.

Pour batter onto the hot waffle iron and cook according to equipment instructions.

Serve immediately, with honey drizzle.

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Zero Waste Homemade Cooling Tea : Monk Fruit +Dried Longans

Zero Waste Cooling Tea : Homemade Monk's Fruit +Dried Longans

Monk fruit (罗汉果) tea is one of the easiest cooling tea to make at home.  The dry goods stores at wet market and chinese medicine halls sell them in bulk without packing, at just 30 cents per fruit.  The dry goods store I visit frequently also carries dried longan flesh (minus the shells) in bulk, so I add them to my homemade cooling tea occasionally for additional nutritional benefits.

Zero Waste Cooling Tea : Homemade Monk's Fruit +Dried Longans

Just 6 simple steps:
++ Bring a pot of water (1 litre to 1 fruit) to boil.
++ Scrub clean the outer shell of the monk fruit, crush the fruit with bare hands and break up the flesh of the fruit further into 4 parts.  Since the fruit is not eaten and needs to be separated from the tea, I try not to crush the shell and flesh into too many tiny pieces to save me the trouble to search for them after making the tea.
++ Add the shell and flesh into the pot of boiling water, boil on high heat for 5 minutes.
++ Add dried longans, turn the heat down slightly, cover the pot and simmer for another 30 minutes.
++ Turn off the heat and let the tea cool down completely.
++ Remove the remains of monk fruit and serve.

Zero Waste Cooling Tea : Homemade Monk's Fruit +Dried Longans

The remains go into my frozen stash for composting, nothing for the incinerator.

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11 (Almost) Free Stuff

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co 11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

I picked up these two discarded items from my void deck :

(top) the crockery jar pot still has its “$19.90” price sticker intact, so my guess is that it’s brand new.

(bottom) this Pyrex brand beaker is actually a carafe dismantled from a poorly maintained french press coffeemaker.  The “plunger” component is missing, all that was left was a badly stained plastic frame and this glass carafe.  After a 30-second soak in hot water, the beaker slides out from the frame easily.  Another 30-second scrubbing with baking soda, the glass beaker starts to look pretty and new again.  Open terrarium, anyone?

While it’s not every day that I can find free usable things on my walking path, here are 10 almost-free items that pop up occasionally in my kitchen:

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++ 001. FREE! BODY SCRUB – from used coffee grounds after a morning cuppa.  After I posted this idea on my FB, someone alerted me that the caffeine is great for banishing cellulite too.  Although most recipes I found online mix coffee grounds with oil to make body scrub, I am simply too lazy to wash up a greasy shower area after my home spa sessions, so I stick to just plain old coffee grounds.  If you don’t drink coffee at home, try requesting used coffee grounds from cafes, a tip some home gardeners share as they use the coffee grounds from cafes as fertilizers.

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++002. FREE! CUTTING BOARD CLEANER – Most instructions like this and this ask for freshly cut lemon halves which are used to rub salt into the board.  I use only lemons that have their juice squeezed out to make lemonade.  I don’t have extremely strong arms, so there is always residual juice left in the pulp, not a lot, but somehow enough to cover the entire chopping board.  Great for freshening up boards that are starting to transfer too much garlic smell onto any food that it is in contact with.

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++003. FREE! FOOD SAVERS – Reuse glass jars as tiny food savers.  See though means I know exactly what’s inside my fridge, and what I need to clear.  No food wasted.

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++004. FREE! TEA LIGHT HOLDERS – Tiny glass jars are the perfect size for this project.  More glass upcycling ideas here.

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++005. FREE! WRITING PAPERS – End of the school year means that the kids will be back with half used exercise books, I have been doing this with my limited book binding skill when I accumulate enough sheets.

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++006. FREE! MESH PRODUCE BAGS – I asked for these from the vegetable stall holder who throws them away anyway.  Great replacement for plastic bags.

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++007. FREE! TRASH BAGS. Anything that comes in a plastic bag can become a trash bag.

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++008. FREE! SHOPPING BAGS – These 10kg rice bags with handles can carry up to 10kg loads of shopping items, open up the sewn rice bag like this to do the least damage to it and start reusing these tough bags!

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++009. FREE! KEEPSAKE BOX – Upcycled from fanciful mooncake boxes.

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++010. FREE! RUBBER BANDS – Why buy these anyway?

11 (Almost) Free Stuff // Mono + Co

++ 011. FREE! DESICCANT – These little sachets are in every individually sealed mooncakes.  I also found them in groundnut snacks.  I throw them inside any airtight containers that could do with a little less moisture, e,g, cookie jars, coffee grounds, tea leaves etc.

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Tiny Batch Kitchen : Dragon Fruit Jam

Tiny Batch Kitchen : Dragon Fruit Jam // Mono + Co

The red dragon fruits at a fruit stall were clearing at 3 for $2, too good an offer to be passed up, especially when they are the red variety.

Though they appeared a bit wet, the fruit felt firm though.  Since the peel of dragon fruit is quite thick, I reckoned that the flesh should still be edible, even if these are over-ripe.  Once I reached home, I cut up the fruit and stored the dark colored flesh in an airtight container so that the whole fruit will not ripen further.

While they are fine to be eaten as fruits, the color was so pretty that I turned one of them into jam.  The end result reminded me of the blueberry compote I posted last year.  I turn blueberries into preserves when they are on offer, but this is even cheaper.  And they even taste like jam made of berries!

Tiny Batch Kitchen : Dragon Fruit Jam // Mono +Co

I didn’t follow any recipe, another one of my many cook by feel/taste attempts.

Simply chop up the flesh of one dragon fruit into chunks and cook over medium heat.  Once the fruit gets cooked, softened and begin to release its juice, break up the fruit pieces further with the back of a wooden spoon to release more even liquid to cook the flesh further.  I used a hot pot ladle with holes and simply press down the fruit to squash them.  Add 1 tablespoon of sugar, keep stirring and cooking.  Squeeze juice from half a lemon into the cooking jam.  Continue to stir as the jam reduces its liquid into a thick consistency.  Taste test if the sweet/sour level is to your liking and adjust by adding sugar/lemon juice accordingly.

Tiny Batch Kitchen : Dragon Fruit Jam // Mono +Co

The jam will thicken further when cool down.  Store the jam in a sterilised glass jar and finish them up as soon as possible, especially if not much sugar has been added as natural preservatives.

Tiny Batch Kitchen : Dragon Fruit Jam // Mono +Co

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Simple Pleasures

a few incidents that made me realize how the my eco-conscious habits have rubbed off on the kids. nothing complicated, just start with no wasting of food at home and go shopping together with reusable shopping bags.

Simple Pleasures // Mono + Co

// because someone didn’t want it, she brought back and we shared it together after dinner so that the untouched buttercream cake would not be wasted.

Simple Pleasures // Mono + Co

// because her friend finished the bubble tea and was about to bin these disposables, she carried these all the way home to be rinsed and recycled.

Simple Pleasures // Mono + Co

// because the top is still wearable after mending, she asked for help with my limited sewing skills to extend its wear longer.

Simple Pleasures // Mono + Co

// because this was to be discarded after a pomelo peeling competition, she brought back the peeled fruit for me to make pomelo pulp juice.  I shared with her how to make great smelling citrus infused vinegar so that she will bring back the peels as well next time.

Simple Pleasures // Mono + Co

// because the little one felt “lucky that we bring along our reusable cutlery set”, so she can have a last minute ramen treat without the standard disposables.  We were too slow to stop the drink that came in a set but took for no straw.  I told her: “we take note this time, we’ll definitely do better next time.”

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Homemade 2-Ingredient Lip Balm

Homemade 2-Ingredient Lip Balm // Mono + Co

These are a breeze to make, under 20 minutes was all it took after I finished experimenting with my wood butter.  I am using the same recipe as my wood butter : 3 parts coconut oil and 1 part beeswax.  Even this ratio is measured by eyeballing given the tiny batch I am making.  My yardstick for a successful lipbalm recipe is down to earth realistic: as long as the mixture hardens to a balm consistency at room temperature, I won’t frown over a few millilitres differences, not when everything is made of natural ingredients.

If you are interested, this beeswax to oil ratio guide seems to suggest that 1-3 is a good mix for balms.  In fact, on days when I can’t locate my chapstick, I simply smear some oil on my lips and I am good to go.

Homemade 2-Ingredient Lip Balm // Mono + Co

Adding coconut oil is a good idea here in Singapore since it stays in liquid state at room temperature, so the lip balm will be softer to apply.  If you prefer to perfume your lip balm with essential oils, neutral smelling carrier oil like almond and avocado oil will be a better choice.

Homemade 2-Ingredient Lip Balm // Mono + CoHomemade 2-Ingredient Lip Balm // Mono + Co

I mix and heat oil and beeswax in this tiny glass measuring beaker from Daiso.  The beeswax turns solid quickly after the beaker has been removed from water bath.  I am fighting against time to fill the container with the mixture, while the pouring stream starts to solidify.  It is therefore not a good idea use a tall and large mason jar that will end up with lots of solidified wax at the sides during transferring.  This 100ml beaker therefore seems to be the perfect size for my homemade skincare treats.  The spout also helps pouring the mixture into the narrow lipstick tube easier without the need to buy a tiny funnel.

I have some previously diy-ed cocoa butter beeswax lotion that are still way to hard to apply and taking forever to use up.  I will be melting a portion of it with a suitable carrier oil in this beaker to reconstitute into a lotion,  I think my dry feet will thank me.

Brown Banana Ice Cream

Brown Banana Ice Cream // Mono + Co

This is not exactly a post about saving brown bananas from becoming food waste although it looks like it.

Brown Banana Ice Cream // Mono + Co

I intentionally waited for these bananas to develop as many brown/black spots as possible, short of turning into a puddle on the kitchen counter before I use them for making ice cream.  The sweetness level shoots up as bananas rot, perfect for making desserts.  If you have seen Christina Tosi demo her banana cream pie recipe in one of the episodes of “The Mind of a Chef”, you will understand why I say “rot”.  I would have never thought such blackened banana is still edible.

Brown Banana Ice Cream // Mono + Co

I adapted from this recipe, altering the recipe savagely.  I did away with the white chocolate since I have a feeling that my 2 very ripened bananas are going to be really sweet.  I also halved the sugar amount and added 1 tablespoon of raw honey instead, partly to replace the corn syrup too.  Without cream cheese at home, I also omitted that but added 1/4 teaspoon of pink salt (recipe called for 1/8) to sort of replace the salt from the cheese.  After 20 minutes of churning the chilled cream and freezing it overnight, the end result is a creamy dessert that is unmistakenly banana in flavor.  Perfect for my banana lovers at home.

Brown Banana Ice Cream // Mono + Co


BROWN BANANA ICE CREAM

adapted from here

2 cups whole milk
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 cup heavy cream **
1/3 cup raw sugar
1 tablespoon raw honey
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
2 ripe bananas, chopped into chunks

** I used whipping cream instead of heavy cream

Scoop 2 tablespoons of milk and mix with cornstarch in a bowl to form a smooth slurry.  Set aside.

In a saucepan, add the remaining milk, salt, heavy cream, sugar, honey and vanilla extract and cook to a rolling boil.  Remove from heat, add the banana chunks and puree with an immersion hand blender.Let it boil for 4 minutes, then shift the pot away from heat, and add the cornstarch mixture.

Remove from heat, add the banana chunks and puree with an immersion hand blender. Bring the mixture back to boil again, and let it boil for exactly 4 minutes. then shift the pot away from heat, and add the cornstarch mixture.

Shift the pot away from heat, add the cornstarch mixture, and bring it to boil over medium heat, this time while stirring continuously with a heat proof spatula or hand whisk.  After boiling about 1 minute, the mxiture will thicken.  Remove from heat and let mixture cool to room temperature.  Cover the saucepan and chill it in the fridge for a few hours.

Pour the chilled mixture into the ice cream maker and churn for 20-25 minutes.  Transfer to a storage container and freeze until firm for at least 4 hours or overnight.

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I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet

I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

So talks are finally underway to stop giving out plastic bags for free in a bid to reduce a global plastic pollution problem.  I started grocery shopping with my own reusable bags 5 years ago, and to date, I am still unable to clear my stockpile of bags. I found this singlet bag all the way from 2012, still in perfectly good condition, as if I have just gotten it yesterday.

Besides becoming litter when disposed of in an inconsiderate manner, plastic waste is creating havoc on earth for the same reason that made them so popular: their durability makes them hard to break down and go away after we are done with their intended use.  The need for something to be lightweight and cheap to produce has created what seems to me as an over-reliance on disposal plastic products like shopping bags, takeaway beverage cups and food containers, straws, etc.  These plastic items are usually good for only one-time use but the discarded plastic waste stays around for a very long time.

Actually, it is kind of a wasteful trait to be telling my kids that humans invented and produce plastic disposable items so that we can be free from the washing task after we are done with our lunch/ coffee/ bubble tea drink, and the pile of disposable plastic waste problem is for someone else to settle.  Don’t we want to raise our kids to be thrifty and frugal?  How do we do that when we keep telling them to throw away things that have been used for barely an hour in the case of takeaway lunch or beverage?

I am no expert on plastic waste management, but I have somehow found a few nifty ways to survive without a kitchen drawer filled with plastic shopping bags for the past few years, and I think I am getting better with each shopping day.  While the bags will only be chargeable starting middle of next year, it doesn’t hurt to start saving a few more plastic bags now from choking the waterways/killing the wildlife/ending up on our dining plate.

Here are 6 tips on how I reduce my reliance on supermarket shopping bags and I hope they will be useful if you are attempting to cut out plastic bags from your shopping trips.


001. Replace waste bin liner with the newspaper

I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

Like how Audrey Hepburn line hers in her kitchen, you can easily fold one following this video, or

I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

do without a bin completely and fold a standing one like this.

002. Separate the wet kitchen trash from the dry ones.

It’s usually the wet trash that needs to be bagged in plastic to prevent leaks.  The dry ones can be simply wrapped in newspapers before tossing.  The amount of wet trash I produce in my kitchen usually can’t fill up a plastic shopping bag, so I reuse other packaging I have salvaged instead, see tip #003.

003. Rethink plastic shopping bags as the only trash bags at home.

I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

The most common response I get from shopping without plastic bags is: “How do you bag your trash?” My answer to that will be:” Every darn packaging that comes with the things I buy!”

Like plastic bags, even these are quick to pile up since we live in a world surrounded by packaging.  The photo above shows what I can accumulate in a day: a commercial bread packaging (when I run out of time to bake my own), a plastic bag from brown rice, and a Milo powder refill sachet.  These can be my alternative trash bags but are often are too large for my wet kitchen trash, so I  send them for recycling instead.  I use smaller plastic bags from packing mushrooms, sugar, rice flour, and salt to bag my wet kitchen trash usually.

004.  Reduce waste: Start recycling

I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

Sorting out the recyclables will greatly reduce the amount of “real” trash thrown away.  Starting a recycling corner to collect recyclables like paper, plastic, metal and glass containers.  Deposit them into the blue recycling bins that have been conveniently placed around the estates instead of throwing them away as rubbish.

005. Reduce waste:  the raw vegetable and fruit scraps

I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

My kitchen scrap level is now super low since I make eco enzyme with raw vegetable and fruits scraps and send the rest for composting.

I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

If composting or making eco enzyme is too complex at first, start with baby steps: make this citrus-infused vinegar with orange/lemon/grapefruit/pomelo peels and use it as an all-purpose cleaner.  Simply fill a container with citrus fruit peels that you would normally discard, top up with white vinegar, and wait around 3 days.  The nice smelling citrus vinegar can now be diluted for cleaning use.

006. Bring along reusable shopping bags
I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

Now that the need for shopping bag as trash bags has been eliminated, it’s time to stop accumulating these plastic bags during shopping trips.  The habit to bring at least 2 reusable shopping bags in my carryall tote, and more if it is a planned grocery shopping trip, has stucked with me for years. I mentioned here before that a cotton tote requires 327 times of usage for its carbon foot print to be on par with that from manufacturing a plastic bag.  Clearly, buying a new reusable shopping bag every shopping trip because one  forgot to bring it out is not environmentally friendly.  Having a stash of foldable shopping bag helped me a lot, since it is convenient to toss one of these neat pouches into my bag and it stays folded inside my bag until I open it up to use.


We are definitely not the first in the world to be charging for plastic bags, neighboring countries like Taiwan, Hong Kong and Malaysia have already done so.  Some shoppers who forget to bring their bag or buy more than they can fit into their bags will reuse shipping cartons discarded by the supermarkets to fill their purchase.  I wonder if the local supermarkets will allow shoppers to do the same during the initial stage until they pick up the habit to bring their reusable shopping bags.

I stopped accepting plastic shopping bags for 5 years and have not run out of trash bags yet // Mono + Co

I am currently getting most of my fresh groceries from the wet market as I try to eliminate the cellophane bags that the vegetables are wrapped in.  Let’s talk more about plastic-free shopping some day.

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