Honey Taro Sandwich Loaf

Honey Taro Sandwich Loaf / Mono + Co

After baking these buns at a lower oven temperature that produced really soft texture, I wanted to see if this can be replicated on covered loaf recipes to turn them softer.

End result: softer, thinner crust with crumbs that stay soft and fluffy.

Honey Taro Sandwich Loaf / Mono + Co

I also added an extra tablespoon of raw honey to this recipe, as I usually can taste some sweetness in my bread, but never the aroma of honey.  This time, with 3 tablespoons in total, I finally can taste the honey in my end bake.  But this also means that I need to add slightly lesser liquid (water in this case) to my dough to make it easier to handle/shape.  Like I mentioned in my other recipes, I like to add just half the liquid stated in the recipe first, then top up slowly till the dough finally come together into a firm ball.  I do this to prevent the dough from getting too wet when I tweak the recipes/ ingredients.  I noticed that even an alteration in the brand/type of flour, sometimes the liquid amount required might also deviate slightly.

Honey Taro Sandwich Loaf / Mono + Co Honey Taro Sandwich Loaf / Mono + Co


Honey Taro Sandwich Loaf

225g plain flour
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
3 tablespoons raw honey
105g mashed taro
80g water
30g cold butter, cubed

In a mixer bowl, place the dry ingredients: plain flour, instant yeast, and sea salt, mix these dry ingredients well with a hand whisk.  Next, add cooled mashed taro, raw honey, and half of the water to the dry ingredients, and knead with a dough hook attachment on the lowest speed (KA 1).  Slowly add the remaining of the water with the mixer running, you may need more or less of the water stated in the recipe.  Watch the dough, when the ingredients come into a ball,  stop adding water and turn off the mixer.  Let the dough rest for 15 minutes.

Start the mixer running on its lowest speed again to knead the dough for 1 minute, before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead until the dough reaches window pane stage, this is when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic, and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.  Remove the bowl from mixer, cover and bulk rise for 1 hour.

After an hour, the dough should rise to double its volume, punch it down to release the gas, and transfer to a clean work top. Shape the dough and place in a well-greased Pullman tin, seam side downwards, and cover the tin.  Remember to grease the cover as well.

Let the bread rise for 60 minutes then bake for 30 minutes in a preheated oven at 180C.  Remove bread from tin immediately after baking and leave it to cool completely on a rack.

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A Dough for 1 Wholemeal Taro Loaf + 4 Buns

Wholemeal Taro Loaf // Mono + Co Wholemeal Taro Loaf // Mono + Co Wholemeal Taro Loaf // Mono + Co Wholemeal Taro Loaf // Mono + Co Wholemeal Taro Loaf // Mono + Co Wholemeal Taro Loaf // Mono + Co

Yes! Another taro loaf recipe.  But I added 100 gram more flour to have some excess dough for 4 buns, 50g of dough for each bun to be exact.  I also filled the buns with cream cheese, with this soft sweet bun recipe, any filling will go with it, just add your favorite.

Wholemeal Taro Loaf // Mono + CoWholemeal Taro Loaf // Mono + Co

I can make three loaves of bread with half a taro bought from the market.  Even after adding an egg, and a generous slab of butter, the bread appears white, not yellowish.  This is what I like about adding taro to Asian style bread recipes.

If you like to bake a loaf for next day’s breakfast and extra four buns for afternoon tea, here’s the recipe:


1 loaf + 4 buns recipe

250g bread flour
50g wholemeal flour
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons raw sugar
1/2 tablespoon instant yeast
100g steamed taro, mashed
1 egg, 70g with shell
30g water
35g cold butter, cubed

In a mixer bowl, mix well the dry ingredients: bread flour, wholemeal flour, yeast, sea salt, and raw sugar with a hand whisk.  Add cooled mashed taro, egg, and water to the dry ingredients, and knead with a dough hook attachment on the lowest speed (KA 1) until the ingredients come into a ball.  Let the dough stand for 15 minutes, cover the bowl with a clean tea towel if it’s windy in your kitchen.

Start the mixer running on its lowest speed again, and knead the dough for 1 minute, before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead until the dough reaches window pane stage, this is when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic, and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.  Remove the bowl from mixer, cover with tea towel, and bulk rise for 1 hour.

After an hour, the dough should rise to double its volume, punch it down to release the gas, and transfer to a clean work top.  Flatten the dough to push out gas trapped inside the dough, either by hand or a rolling pin.  Shape the dough and place it in a greased bread tin, seam side facing downwards.  Let this sit in a draft free place to rise for another 50-60 minutes.

Take out 4 x 50g of dough, and shape them into balls on a baking tray.

Shape the remaining dough into a loaf and place it in a greased bread tin, seam side facing downwards.  Let this sit in a draft free place to rise for another 50-60 minutes.  I divided the remaining dough into 3 equal parts and shape them swiss rolls style.

Let bun dough proof for 45 minutes, bake for 25min at 170C.

For Pullman loaf, proof for 50-60 minutes, bake in a preheated oven at 170C for 30 minutes.  Remove the bread from the pan immediately after baking, and let it cool on a rack completely before slicing or serving.

Store in an airtight container if not consumed immediately, to keep the loaf soft and the crumbs from drying out.

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