Sweet Milk Bread Loaf

Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co

This is baked with the same straight dough recipe that I use for making sugar topped pull apart buns.  Instead of baking in a rectangular cake pan, I divided the dough into 6 portions and arranged them in a bread tin to be proofed into a loaf.

Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + CoSweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co  Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co

The dough rose beautifully to reach the brim in less 60 minutes.  Simply adjust the baking time 5-8 minutes longer at the same oven temperature.

Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + CoSweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co  Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co

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Oat Porridge Sourdough

Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co

Great recipe if you are thinking of baking a softer sourdough bread.  Oat porridge did the magic here.  For so long, I have been adding different types of root vegetable puree into my bread dough knowing that they help to make my Pullman loaves and buns really fluffy.  No chemical bread enhancer, no packaged dough conditioner, just steamed vegetables, how natural and nutritious does that sound?

So when I heard that there is a sourdough recipe out there enriched with oat porridge that makes it softer, of course, I want to try it.  See how soft it turned out.

Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co

I used instant oatmeal to make the porridge instead of cooking rolled oats porridge over the stove.  I also stick to baking my dough cold straight from the fridge and shaping my loaf just before baking.  As for the rest of the instructions, I followed to a T, down right to coating the crust with rolled oats and giving the top with 4 snips with scissors to create that “zipper” look.


OAT PORRIDGE SOURDOUGH

adapted from the perfect loaf

for oatmeal porridge:
250g boiling hot water
125g instant oatmeal

75g fed starter
350g+12g+12g water
350g of plain flour
150g whole wheat flour
10g sea salt

To prepare oat porridge, mix hot water to instant oatmeal and stir until a thick consistency is formed. Leave it aside to cool completely.

In a large mixing bowl, add fed starter to 350g of water and stir with a wooden spoon to mix well.  Next, add plain flour, whole wheat flour, and mix with hand to form a dough with no dry flour is visible.  Cover the bowl and leave this aside for 60 minutes.

Sprinkle sea salt over the dough and pour the remaining 12g water on top, and mix the salt, water into the dough by hand using squeezing action.  The dough by now will appear very stretchable and doesn’t stick to the side of the bowl.  Leave this aside for 30 minutes, cover the bowl with a lid or tea towel.

After 30 minutes, incorporate oatmeal porridge to the dough in 4 separate additions,  with each addition, folding the dough so that the porridge get mixed as uniformly as possible. The remaining 12g water can be added bit by bit if the dough feels too dry. You may not need to use up all the remaining water, stop once the dough feels wet enough since the oatmeal porridge is also providing hydration to the dough.

Do a series of turns 6 times at 30 minutes interval.  With each turn, reach the dough from the bottom of the bowl and pull it up to tuck it to the opposite side of the bowl.  Turn the bowl and repeat for another pull-stretch-tuck action for about 3 more times till one round is completed.  Rest for 30 minutes and repeat this again till you complete 6 sets.

By the end of the 6th turn, cover the container and put the dough into the fridge for overnight retardation.

When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 250C.  Take out the dough from the fridge and shape the cold dough tightly into a ball, while remaining careful not to break up too much of the air pockets that has built up inside the dough.  Invert the dough onto a tray of rolled oats to coat the top part of the bread.  Place the dough inside a floured dutch oven pot seam side downwards.  To score, hold a pair of kitchen scissors almost parallel to the surface of the bread, making 4 snips across the top to create a “zipper” look.

Cover the pot and put it into the preheated oven bake for 40 minutes.

After 40 minutes, remove the cover, reduce the oven temperature to 220C and bake for another 30 minutes.

Cook on rack completely before slicing.  I waited for 4 hours, as recipe suggest the bread need a longer “setting” time due to its higher hydration.

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Natural Starter Milk Loaf

Natual Starter Milk Loaf // Mono + Co Natual Starter Milk Loaf // Mono + Co Natual Starter Milk Loaf // Mono + Co

After mixing a dough for sourdough country dough meant for an overnight fermentation, I fed my balance starter with another 50g water and 50g flour, only to find it rise to double its height again in 3 hours.  Unable to resist the temptation to bake another loaf with such active starter, I went for a softer milk loaf recipe instead.  Recipe largely adapted from this one, minus the taro, added more milk.


Natural Starter Milk Loaf

120g fed starter
165g fresh milk
240g flour
1 tablespoon milk powder
2 tablespoon raw sugar
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
20g cold butter, cubed

In a mixer bowl, add starter and milk, stir to mix well.  Next, add flour, milk powder, sugar and turn on the mixer on its lowest speed to knead with a dough hook until all the ingredients come together into a ball.  Leave this aside for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, sprinkle salt and run the mixer again to knead the dough for 1 minute.

Add cold butter cube by cube and knead until the dough reaches window pane stage. Stop mixer and leave the dough to bulk rise at room temperature for 180 minutes.

After the dough has risen to expand its volume, punch down the dough to deflate and transfer to a clean work top.  Sprinkle worktop and palms with some flour if the dough is too sticky to handle.  shape the dough into a roll that fits the tin, and place it inside, seam side downwards.  Proof for another 90 minutes.

Bake in a preheated oven at 200C for 20 minutes.  Remove bread from tin immediately after baking and cool completely on a rack before slicing or serving.  I brush the top crust with butter to make it softer after cooling down.

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Sugar Topped Pull Apart Buns

Sugar Topped Buns // Mono + CoSugar Topped Buns // Mono + Co

Baked another old school style bread that is still widely available at the commercial bakeries.  Actually, my girl likes this type of bread so much that she often places a few slabs of butter on a slice of white sandwich bread, sprinkles the top with sugar, and pops it into the toaster oven for a few minutes and out comes her favorite “butter-sugar-toast” for breakfast/tea/supper.  It’s an all-occasion snack for her.

Sugar Topped Buns // Mono + Co

Since I am still passionately baking pull apart buns with my rectangular pan, I tried a beautiful butter sugar bun recipe from here just to make the pan work harder.  It has hardly gone through 10 baking sessions since I bought it years ago for a birthday cake recipe that didn’t go as planned.

Sugar Topped Buns // Mono + Co

As this pan is deep (3-inch tall), the dough had no other space to expand but to rise towards the brim.  I love how this creates buns that are more evenly shaped after they are baked, compared to baking them on a larger cookie sheet pan.

Note:  My cake pan does not have a non-stick coated surface, hence I grease it really well when I bake bread with it since the dough expands to reach every corner and sides inside the pan.  This greasing step must be done so that the bread can be unmolded easily after baking for cooling which is very important as bread will shrink if left inside the pan to cool.

Sugar Topped Buns // Mono + Co

Quite a few changes were made to the original recipe since it was passed to me with modifications by a lovely member of a separate Facebook interest group.  I tweaked it further with the available resources I have in my pantry and thought it will be useful to jot down, in case you have the same limitations that I have in my tiny home kitchen.

+ I have been baking with plain flour bought in bulk from the market, so I did not use bread flour.
+ The recipe did away with salt as salted butter was used, so I used the modified recipe that has 1/4 teaspoon of salt.
+ The recipe stated 120ml milk while the modified one stated 100ml.  Since I don’t own a measuring cup, I weigh 100g of fresh milk and add it slowly to the dough while the mixer is running, ready to stop when the dough ball is formed.  Turned out 100g of milk was what I needed.
+ Original recipe applied egg wash before baking and cubed butter as toppings which I replaced with a brush of milk and a sprinkle of raw sugar.  I didn’t want to use just 1/4 of an egg for egg wash and having the chore of storing the remaining 3/4 of it.  There wasn’t any plan for an omelet that day either.
+ Original recipe shaped the dough into 9 portions, I divided mine into 8 and shaped them into an equal number of balls and braids, a “do-whatever-you-like” privilege that only home bakers have.

Enjoy yours!


Sugar Topped Buns

+ adapted from oladybakes +

250g plain flour
10g milk powder
45g raw sugar
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
100g fresh milk 
1 egg **
35g unsalted butter, cubed

+ topping +
fresh milk 
raw sugar

** I use small egg weighing 55g with shell.

In a mixer bowl, place plain flour, milk powder, sugar, yeast, salt, egg and milk, start mixer to knead with a dough hook on its lowest speed until a dough ball is formed.  Stop mixer and let the dough sit for 15 minutes.  I do this to let the flour absorb the liquid better before kneading it to window pane stage.

After 15 minutes, start the mixer again, add cubed butter one by one and knead until window pane stage.  Remove bowl from mixer and let dough stand for 15 minutes.

Transfer dough to a clean work top, flour palms and work top slightly if the dough is too sticky to handle.  Divide dough into 8 equal portions.  Shape each dough into a tight ball and place in a baking pan.  I shaped 4 of mine into balls and the remaining 4 into braids baked in a well-greased 6″x9″x3″ rectangular pan.  Let dough rise for 90 minutes.

When ready to bake, brush the top of each dough with fresh milk, and sprinkle raw sugar over.  Bake in a preheated oven for 20 minutes at 170C.

When the bread is done, unmold the bread from the pan and let it cool completely on a rack.

Pull apart and serve, or store balance in an airtight container to keep crumbs soft and fluffy.

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Taro Raisin Buns

Taro Raisin Buns // Mono + Co

Fluffy soft pull apart bread for breakfast again, this time with raisins.

Taro Raisin Buns // Mono + CoTaro Raisin Buns // Mono + Co  Taro Raisin Buns // Mono + CoTaro Raisin Buns // Mono + Co


Taro Raisin Buns

270g plain flour
1 teaspoon instant dry yeast
120g steamed taro
1 tablespoon raw honey
60g whipping cream (38%)
1 egg
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
15g cold butter cubed
50g raisins
optional: rolled oats for garnish

** Soak raisins in a bowl of warm water for 30 minutes.  Drain and gently squeeze dry to remove excess liquid before use.

In a mixer bowl, place plain flour, instant yeast, mashed and cooled steamed taro, raw honey, cream, beaten egg and knead with a dough hook attachment on the lowest speed (KA 1).  Stop the mixer when the ingredients come into a ball.  Let the dough rest for 15-30 minutes.

After resting the dough, sprinkle the sea salt on the dough.  Start the mixer running on its lowest speed again to knead the dough for 1 minute, before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead until the dough reaches window pane stage, this is when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic, and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.  Add raisins while mixer is running and knead for about 1 minute to incorporate the raisins into the dough. Remove the bowl from mixer, cover and bulk rise for 1 hour.

After an hour, the dough will rise and increase its volume, punch it down to release the gas, and transfer to a clean work top.  Flatten the dough to push out gas trapped inside the dough, either by hand or a rolling pin.  Flour hands and worktop to help with shaping if the dough is sticky.  Divide the dough into 6 equal parts, shape each into a ball and place it in a greased tin or pan, seam side facing downwards.  Let this sit in a draft-free place to rise for another 50-60 minutes.

Bake in a preheated oven at 170C for 25 minutes.  Remove the bread from the pan immediately after baking, and let it cool on a rack completely before slicing or serving.

Store in a covered container if not consumed immediately, to keep the loaf soft and the crumbs from drying out.

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Anpan

Anpan // Mono+Co

Pillowy soft dough with sweet red bean paste filling.  Anpan used to be a must-buy for me before the varieties of buns increased along with the number of bakeries islandwide.  Bought this packet of red bean paste from Daiso and used my favorite dough recipe with mashed taro to bake 6 buns in a rectangular pan.

Anpan // Mono+CoAnpan // Mono+CoAnpan // Mono+CoAnpan // Mono+Co Anpan // Mono+Co Anpan // Mono+Co Anpan // Mono+CoAnpan // Mono+Co Anpan // Mono+Co


Anpan

290g plain flour
1 teaspoon instant dry yeast
150g steamed taro
1 tablespoon raw honey
1 egg
50g water
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
20g cold butter, cubed
35g x 6 red bead paste **
white sesame seeds

** I use ready-made Azuki red bean paste from Daiso.

In a mixer bowl, place plain flour, instant yeast, mashed and cooled steamed taro, raw honey, beaten egg and knead with a dough hook attachment on the lowest speed (KA 1).  Slowly add the water with the mixer running, you may need more or less of the water stated in the recipe.  Watch the dough, when the ingredients come into a ball,  stop adding and turn off the mixer.  Let the dough rest for 15-30 minutes.

After resting the dough, sprinkle the sea salt on the dough.  Start the mixer running on its lowest speed again to knead the dough for 1 minute, before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead until the dough reaches window pane stage, this is when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic, and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.  Remove the bowl from mixer, cover and bulk rise for 1 hour.

After an hour, the dough will rise and increase its volume, punch it down to release the gas, and transfer to a clean work top.  Flour hands and worktop with flour to help with shaping if the dough is sticky.  Divide the dough into 6 equal parts.  Flatten a piece of dough on the work top and place 1 x 35g red bean paste in the middle.  Wrap the azuki bean paste inside the dough and shape it into a ball.  Place it in a greased tin or pan, seam side facing downwards.  Repeat for the remaining 5 pieces of dough.  Let them sit in a draft-free place to rise for another 50 minutes.

Just before baking, sprinkle some white sesame seeds on top of each bun.  Bake in a preheated oven at 170C for 23 minutes.

Remove the bread from the pan immediately after baking, and let it cool on a rack completely before serving.

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Taro Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns // Mono + Co Hot Cross Buns // Mono + Co Hot Cross Buns // Mono + Co Hot Cross Buns // Mono + Co Hot Cross Buns // Mono + Co

Jumping on the hot cross bun bandwagon with my taro enriched bread recipe.  I realized that my 6″x9″x3″ rectangle pan is perfect for baking this recipe!

This hot cross bun is made plain, without raisins and mix spice.  So I serve it with butter and kaya, local style.


Taro Hot Cross Buns

270 plain flour
1 teaspoon instant dry yeast
120g mashed taro
2 tablespoons raw honey
1 egg
50g water
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
20g butter
for cross:
1 tablespoon plain flour
water

In a mixer bowl, place plain flour, instant yeast, mashed and cooled steamed taro, raw honey, beaten egg and knead with a dough hook attachment on the lowest speed (KA 1).  Slowly add the water with the mixer running, you may need more or less of the water stated in the recipe.  Watch the dough, when the ingredients come into a ball,  stop adding and turn off the mixer.  Let the dough rest for 15-30 minutes.

After resting the dough, sprinkle the sea salt on the dough.  Start the mixer running on its lowest speed again to knead the dough for 1 minute, before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead until the dough reaches window pane stage, this is when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic, and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.  Remove the bowl from mixer, cover and bulk rise for 1 hour.

After an hour, the dough will rise and increase its volume, punch it down to release the gas, and transfer to a clean work top.  Flatten the dough to push out gas trapped inside the dough, either by hand or a rolling pin.  Flour hands and worktop with flour to help with shaping if the dough is sticky.  Divide the dough into 6 equal parts, shape each into a ball and place it in a greased tin or pan, seam side facing downwards.  Let this sit in a draft-free place to rise for another 50-60 minutes.

Make a flour paste with plain flour with just enough water to smooth but not runny paste.  Pipe the paste on the top of each bun to make a cross.

Bake in a preheated oven at 170C for 30 minutes.  Remove the bread from the pan immediately after baking, and let it cool on a rack completely before slicing or serving.

Store in a covered container if not consumed immediately, to keep the loaf soft and the crumbs from drying out.

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Pumpkin Sourdough (No Recipe)

Pumpkin Sourdough // Mono + Co Pumpkin Sourdough // Mono + Co Pumpkin Sourdough // Mono + CoPumpkin Sourdough // Mono + CoPumpkin Sourdough // Mono + Co

No recipe because while mixing the dough, I got lost halfway jotting down how much flour I have topped up.  Did I stop after 2 tablespoons? Or was it 3?  But I remember starting the mixture with 270g of flour.  Without adding water, the dough was already wet with liquid from the starter, pumpkin, and honey.  I enjoyed the bread: sweetness from the pumpkin that ends with tangy flavor. Crumb is moist and slightly burnt crust was thin and flavorful.  Definitely worth trying again to find out the amount of flour I added.

Ingredients + steps for my future reference:
+ plain flour, unknown amount
+ 150g fed starter
+ 120g mashed steamed pumpkin
+ 2 tablespoons raw honey
Mix and left to autolyse for 1 hour.
+ 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
Knead with mixer until the salt is incorporated into the dough.
+ 18g cold cubed butter
Knead till window pane stage.
Transfer to a covered container and leave in the fridge for 1 day.
Next day, remove from fridge, shape the dough gently into a ball, creating a smooth and stretched outer surface.
Line the bottom of a dutch oven with rice flour.  Place the shaped dough inside, dust surface of dough with rice flour, score the loaf to liking and bake covered for 40 minutes in a preheated oven at 250C.  I made a 30 degree cut to create “ears”.
After 40 minutes, remove the cover and bake for another 20 minutes at 220C.  When done, transfer the bread to a rack to cool completely, at least 1 hour, before slicing or serving.

Pumpkin Sourdough // Mono + Co

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Flaxseed Taro Loaf

Flaxseed Taro Loaf // Mono + Co Flaxseed Taro Loaf // Mono + Co Flaxseed Taro Loaf // Mono + Co Flaxseed Taro Loaf // Mono + Co

I applied a step from making sourdough bread to this yeasted recipe: only add salt to the dough after the autolyse stage.  It didn’t seem to make any difference to my taro bread recipe, but I thought my dough reached window pane stage slightly earlier than usual.  Someone else commented the same thing here so this could be making an impact on my bread just that I didn’t know. There is really no harm adding the salt later (I think) so I will be doing this for all my future bread recipes.

The flaxseeds were a last minute add-on.  Got them on a 20% offer, $5.44 for a 500g pack, and they are organic.  The bread rose tall enough after 50 minutes into its final proofing but I find the bread top too bare.  Before sending it into the oven, I mist the loaf with water and sprinkle a tablespoon of flaxseeds on top.


Flaxseed Taro Loaf

270g plain flour
1 teaspoon instant yeast
100g steamed taro
2 tablespoons raw honey
1 large egg
70g water
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
20g cold butter, cubed
1 tablespoon flaxseeds

In a mixer bowl, place these ingredients: plain flour, instant yeast, mashed and cooled steamed taro, raw honey, beaten egg and knead with a dough hook attachment on the lowest speed (KA 1).  Slowly add the water with the mixer running, you may need more or less of the water stated in the recipe.  Watch the dough, when the ingredients come into a ball,  stop adding and turn off the mixer.  Let the dough rest for 15-30 minutes.

After resting the dough, sprinkle the sea salt on the dough.  Start the mixer running on its lowest speed again to knead the dough for 1 minute, before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead until the dough reaches window pane stage, this is when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic, and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.  Remove the bowl from mixer, cover and bulk rise for 1 hour.

After an hour, the dough should rise and increase its volume, punch it down to release the gas, and transfer to a clean work top.  Flatten the dough to push out gas trapped inside the dough, either by hand or a rolling pin.  The dough is quite sticky, flour hands and worktop with flour to help with shaping.  Shape the dough into a log and place it in a greased bread tin, seam side facing downwards.  Let this sit in a draft-free place to rise for another 50-60 minutes.  When the bread has risen to the rim of the baking tin, brush some water on the surface and sprinkle flaxseeds even on top.

Bake in a preheated oven at 170C for 30 minutes.  Remove the bread from the pan immediately after baking, and let it cool on a rack completely before slicing or serving.

Store in an airtight container if not consumed immediately, to keep the loaf soft and the crumbs from drying out.

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