Oatmeal Porridge White Pullman Loaf

Oatmeal Porridge White Pullman Loaf // Mono + Co

I like how oatmeal porridge in this recipe made the sourdough bread really soft, so I added 135g of it to my bake today.  I probably need to add more if I want it to be as soft and fluffy as the ones I bake with steamed taro or steamed white rice.

Oatmeal Porridge White Pullman Loaf // Mono + Co

Oatmeal Porridge White Pullman Loaf // Mono + Co

 


Oatmeal Porridge Pullman Loaf

for oatmeal porridge:
100g boiling hot water
35g instant oatmeal

290g bread flour
1/2 tablespoon instant dry yeast
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons raw sugar
1 large egg **
80g water
25g cold butter, cubed
topping: 2 tablespoons rolled oats

** I use a large egg weighing 70g.

To prepare oat porridge, mix hot water to instant oatmeal and stir until a thick consistency is formed. Leave it aside to cool completely.

In mixer bowl, combine bread flour, yeast, salt, and sugar well with a hand whisk.  After the dry ingredients are mixed, add cooled  oatmeal porridge, beaten egg and half of the water.  Start the mixer and knead on its lowest speed (KA 1) .  If the ingredients do not come together into a ball, slowly add more water, once a ball dough starts to form, stop adding water.  Turn off the mixer and let the dough sit for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, start the mixer again and knead for 1 minute before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead this until the dough reaches window pane stage; when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic.  Remove bowl from mixer and bulk rise this for 1 hour.

Punch the dough down and transfer it to a clean work top.  Shape the loaf and place in greased pullman bread tin, seams side facing downwards.  Let it rise in a draft-free place for 50-60 mins.  Before baking, spray the bread top with a fine mist of water and sprinkle rolled oats on top evenly.

Bake in a preheated oven at 170C for 30 minutes. Remove the bread from the pan immediately after baking, and let it cool on a rack completely before slicing or serving.

Store in an airtight container if not consumed immediately, to keep the loaf soft and the crumbs from drying out.

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Purple Sweet Potato Burger Patty

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

This purple sweet potato burger patty was created based on a taste that I like, smoky with lots of sweetness from onion and basil leaves.  Added walnut and black sesame seeds to make my mum happy, she always worries that I don’t get enough nutrients by going meatless.  But hey look, my recipe is packed with real food, no space for fillers like breadcrumbs or flour!  Pan frying these patties will require a bit of tender loving care as I only add a beaten egg to hold the ingredients together.

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

As I made this through trial and error, I don’t have an exact recipe for this.  To recreate this, I will probably be referring to the following photos and estimate the proportion of ingredients by eyeballing.  I did not come up with this recipe from scratch though.  Other than having a rough idea how I want my burger to taste, I referred to one of my favorite recipe sites, Minimalist Baker , for some ideas on creating this delicious looking sweet potato burger patty.


Purple Sweet Potato Burger Patty, A Rough Guide

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

In a food processor, blitz a handful of walnuts and about 1/4 yellow onion.

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

Add this to steamed and mashed sweet purple potatoes (from 2 medium size ones), a tablespoon of black sesame seeds, a handful of sweet basil leaves, chopped, an half a tablespoon of sweet paprika.

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

Stir to mix well.  Depending on how moist the sweet potato is, the patty at this stage will be on the dry side.

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

Slowly add beaten egg and stop just before the patty mixture becomes too wet to be molded.

You should be able to shape the patty by hand to look like this:

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

In a preheated skillet, add some cooking oil.  Gently place the patties on the skillet and fry till both sides are cooked.

To assemble and serve, I added lettuce,

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

sliced red capsicum,

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

cheddar cheese, and grilled portobello mushroom,

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

between 2 burger buns.  Eat immediately.

Purple Sweet Potato Burger // Mono + Co

More meatless vegetarian patty ideas, try out:

// this made with black bean,

// this vegan version with chickpeas and sweet corn,

// my favorite protein, bbq tofu patty,

// another “red meat”-looking patty, using beetroot.

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Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

I save bread packaging from going to landfills by baking my own rustic bread loaves baked with plain flour bought in bulk.  Currently into natural starter and Tartine’s recipes seem to be on everyone’s must-bake list.

There is nothing different about the recipe I used to bake this classic Tartine sourdough except that I have halved it, based on the size of my Dutch Oven and my refrigerator’s capacity.  Why bake the full recipe when it takes me a few mornings to finish one loaf?  What helped a lot is that this dough recipe is a breeze to mix.  Simply mix another batch when the loaf is about to finish.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

An active starter is a critical ingredient here.  I continue to be awed endlessly by my natural starter that produces the most dramatic oven spring in my short sourdough baking history.  Coating the surface of the bread with rice flour before slashing is also a must, to make the “split” more obvious and help it look more ‘pro’ and rustic.  My heart skips a beat every time I uncover the pot after the first 40 minutes in the oven.

To ensure that the starter is active, I make sure that I feed my starter at regular interval until it can double within 3 hours at room temperature which is 30C here.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

While the original recipe stated 20 minutes with the lid and 20-25 minutes with the lid off, this is for bakers who are experienced or willing to risk a scalding arm with a preheated hot dutch oven pot at 230C.  I bake my dough cold, straight from the chiller and in an unheated pot, but I still manage to get a perfect oven spring and a crust that caramalize to a beautiful brown.  I have to bake the bread longer though: 40 minutes in the oven with the lid on and another 40minutes without the lid.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Made for myself a step by step pictorial guide with 1/2 the ingredients of this recipe.  Hope you will find it useful too.


Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf

Start with an active starter, pour 125g into a mixer bowl, and add 370g water.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Stir around with a wooden spoon until the starter is mixed well with the water.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Add 350g plain flour and 150g wholemeal flour to the diluted starter.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Stir and mix with the wooden spoon.  Let this sit aside for at least 30 minutes, covered.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

After 30 minutes, sprinkle 10g sea salt on top of the dough and another 25g water, and

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

gently stir to mix the salt and water into the autolysed dough, which will appear smoother at this point.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Mix until all the water has been absorbed by the dough.  Then, with a clean wet hand, do a few round of  “stretch and pull” actions.  Let dough sit for another 30 minutes.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

After 30 minutes, repeat the “stretch and pull” action, then let it sit for 30 minutes again.  This will be “Turn #1”.  Repeat this for another 3 times.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

After “Turn #4”, transfer the dough to a container with cover, or simply cover the mixer bowl (if your fridge has ample space for it) with a pot lid of the right size, and let it bulk ferment inside the fridge overnight.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Next morning, when ready to bake, preheat oven to 250C.  Flour the base of a Dutch Oven with rice flour, to prevent the bread from sticking to the pot when baking.  I do this to save on parchment paper.  Retrieve the dough from fridge and shape the dough gently into a ball, place it inside the pot, seam side downwards.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Sprinkle rice flour on top and make a score on the surface of the dough.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Cover and bake for 40 minutes.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

After 40 minutes, Remove cover, and bake for another 40 minutes at 220C.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

After baking, remove the bread from the Dutch Oven immediately, and let it cool completely on a rack before slicing.  Store unfinished bread in an airtight container to prevent crumbs from drying out.

Tartine Sourdough Country Loaf // Mono + Co

Enjoy!

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Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Lemonade

Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Lemonade // Mono + Co

My blue butterfly pea flower lemonade has a lighter hue than what you’ll see here and here.  These recipes state to steep the flowers in boiling water first to allow the blue pigment to be extracted before adding the juice of a lemon and transform the blue tea purple.

I prepared mine in a different order: squeeze the juice of a lemon into a glass first, followed by adding ice cubes that has been frozen with the flowers inside each of them.  This method suits me better since I prefer my lemonade really sour with little dilution. By the time all the ice cubes has melted, at least the drink still stay tasting like lemonade.

Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Lemonade // Mono + Co

I started freezing these blue flowers in my ice cube tray when I ran out of ideas what to do with them as they continue to bloom.  I have since brewed them as hot blue tea, dye a cotton hankerchief into a lightest shade of blue (the color has since faded after a few washing), and conducted a self-learning calligraphy lesson in, you guessed it, blue ink.

Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Lemonade // Mono + Co

This is a great way to preserve the blooms and make pretty drinks.  If you let these ice cubes melt on counter, you will get a puddle of blue ink which you can subsequently use for your favorite  crafting ideas with blue pigment.

Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Lemonade // Mono + Co

Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Lemonade // Mono + Co

Back to my lemonade, as the ice cubes started to melt, the color of the drink slowly turned pink.  It’s so perfect for the warm day!

For the curious ones, this explains the science behind.

Blue Butterfly Pea Flower Lemonade // Mono + Co

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Cucumber Cold Soba Salad

Cucumber Cold Soba Salad // Mono + Co

The hot weather lately is becoming unbearable.  I decided to save myself from the hot kitchen by tossing a salad for lunch.  The only cooking involves boiling the soba, which only takes 4 minutes on the stove if you use an electric kettle to boil the water beforehand.

Cucumber Cold Soba Salad // Mono + Co

I halved the portion and dropped miso and tahini from the original recipe as I wanted a light clear dressing.  Instead of soy sauce, I seasoned the salad with liquid aminos, something I have grown to like with soba.  Rice vinegar provided a nice tangy finish to the dressing, I also added more sesame oil than the original recipe.

Cucumber Cold Soba Salad // Mono + Co Cucumber Cold Soba Salad // Mono + Co Cucumber Cold Soba Salad // Mono + Co


Cucumber Cold Soba Salad

adapted from cookie and kate

1 bunch of soba noodles
1 small japanese cucumber
1 stalk scallions, chopped 
1 stalk cilantro, chopped
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1/2 teaspoon grated ginger
1 tablespoon liquid aminos
or, light soy sauce
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 tablespoon black sesame seeds

Cook soba according to instructions on the packaging.  Drain and rinse with cold water until the noodles are at room temperature.

To prepare Japanese cucumber, use a vegetable peeler to peel skin, use a knife and julienne the peel into thin strips.  Cube the rest of the cucumber and set these aside.

In a bowl, whisk to mix rice vinegar, grated ginger, liquid aminos, sesame oil and red pepper flakes.  Adjust according to taste.  Mix this dressing to coat the cooked soba noodles in a large bowl. Then toss in cubed cucumber and the julienned peels, chopped scallions and cilantro, and black sesame seeds. Adjust seasoning further to liking.

Serve immediately.

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Cooked Rice Pullman Loaf

Cooked Rice Pullman Loaf // Mono + CoCooked Rice Pullman Loaf // Mono + Co

Leftover rice is quite common in my kitchen.  In fact, I will sometimes cook extra for dinner with the intent to turn them into a fast 5-minute fried rice the next day.  Boiling leftover cooked rice with water to make instant porridge is another great idea since the time taken for grains to turn soft is greatly reduced.

This white rice Pullman loaf recipe is a new keeper.  I simply altered a favorite taro bread recipe with leftover cooked rice, out from the oven came a light and fluffy loaf.

I will be baking another loaf later.  This time, I will be cooking the rice for making the bread first, preparing extra for dinner which will be kept warm in a thermal pot until meal time.

Cooked Rice Pullman Loaf // Mono + Co Cooked Rice Pullman Loaf // Mono + Co


Jasmine Rice Pullman Loaf

100g cooked white rice
240g plain flour
1 teaspoon instant yeast
2 tablespoons raw sugar
1 egg **
80g water ***
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
28g cold unsalted butter, cubed

** I used egg weighing 57g with shells
*** You may need more or less of the water stated in the recipe, depending on the flour type and hydration level of the cooked rice.

Blitz cooked rice with as little water as possible with a hand blender, just enough to make a smooth paste.  Add this paste to plain flour, instant yeast, raw sugar, beaten egg, and half of the water into a mixer bowl.  Start the mixer to knead with a dough hook attachment on the lowest speed (KA 1).  Slowly add the remaining water with the mixer running, when the ingredients come into a ball,  stop adding and turn off the mixer.  Let the dough rest for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, sprinkle the sea salt on the dough.  Start the mixer running on its lowest speed again to knead the dough for 1 minute, before adding cubed butter, one by one.  Knead until the dough reaches window pane stage, this is when the dough becomes very smooth and elastic, and starts to pull away from the sides of the bowl.  Remove the bowl from mixer, cover and bulk rise for 1 hour.

After an hour, the dough should rise and increase its volume, punch it down to release the gas, and transfer to a clean work top.  Flatten the dough to push out gas trapped inside the dough.  The dough is quite sticky, flour hands and worktop with flour to help with shaping.  Shape the dough into a log and place it in a greased bread tin, seam side facing downwards.  Let this sit in a draft-free place to rise for another 50-60 minutes.  When the bread has risen to the rim of the baking tin, brush some milk on the surface.

Bake in a preheated oven at 170C for 30 minutes.  Remove the bread from the pan immediately after baking, and let it cool on a rack completely before slicing or serving.

Store in an airtight container if not consumed immediately, to keep the loaf soft and the crumbs from drying out.

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Sweet Milk Bread Loaf

Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co

This is baked with the same straight dough recipe that I use for making sugar topped pull apart buns.  Instead of baking in a rectangular cake pan, I divided the dough into 6 portions and arranged them in a bread tin to be proofed into a loaf.

Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + CoSweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co  Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co

The dough rose beautifully to reach the brim in less 60 minutes.  Simply adjust the baking time 5-8 minutes longer at the same oven temperature.

Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + CoSweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co  Sweet Milk Bread Loaf // Mono + Co

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Oat Porridge Sourdough

Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co

Great recipe if you are thinking of baking a softer sourdough bread.  Oat porridge did the magic here.  For so long, I have been adding different types of root vegetable puree into my bread dough knowing that they help to make my Pullman loaves and buns really fluffy.  No chemical bread enhancer, no packaged dough conditioner, just steamed vegetables, how natural and nutritious does that sound?

So when I heard that there is a sourdough recipe out there enriched with oat porridge that makes it softer, of course, I want to try it.  See how soft it turned out.

Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co Oat Porridge Sourdough // Mono + Co

I used instant oatmeal to make the porridge instead of cooking rolled oats porridge over the stove.  I also stick to baking my dough cold straight from the fridge and shaping my loaf just before baking.  As for the rest of the instructions, I followed to a T, down right to coating the crust with rolled oats and giving the top with 4 snips with scissors to create that “zipper” look.


OAT PORRIDGE SOURDOUGH

adapted from the perfect loaf

for oatmeal porridge:
250g boiling hot water
125g instant oatmeal

75g fed starter
350g+12g+12g water
350g of plain flour
150g whole wheat flour
10g sea salt

To prepare oat porridge, mix hot water to instant oatmeal and stir until a thick consistency is formed. Leave it aside to cool completely.

In a large mixing bowl, add fed starter to 350g of water and stir with a wooden spoon to mix well.  Next, add plain flour, whole wheat flour, and mix with hand to form a dough with no dry flour is visible.  Cover the bowl and leave this aside for 60 minutes.

Sprinkle sea salt over the dough and pour the remaining 12g water on top, and mix the salt, water into the dough by hand using squeezing action.  The dough by now will appear very stretchable and doesn’t stick to the side of the bowl.  Leave this aside for 30 minutes, cover the bowl with a lid or tea towel.

After 30 minutes, incorporate oatmeal porridge to the dough in 4 separate additions,  with each addition, folding the dough so that the porridge get mixed as uniformly as possible. The remaining 12g water can be added bit by bit if the dough feels too dry. You may not need to use up all the remaining water, stop once the dough feels wet enough since the oatmeal porridge is also providing hydration to the dough.

Do a series of turns 6 times at 30 minutes interval.  With each turn, reach the dough from the bottom of the bowl and pull it up to tuck it to the opposite side of the bowl.  Turn the bowl and repeat for another pull-stretch-tuck action for about 3 more times till one round is completed.  Rest for 30 minutes and repeat this again till you complete 6 sets.

By the end of the 6th turn, cover the container and put the dough into the fridge for overnight retardation.

When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 250C.  Take out the dough from the fridge and shape the cold dough tightly into a ball, while remaining careful not to break up too much of the air pockets that has built up inside the dough.  Invert the dough onto a tray of rolled oats to coat the top part of the bread.  Place the dough inside a floured dutch oven pot seam side downwards.  To score, hold a pair of kitchen scissors almost parallel to the surface of the bread, making 4 snips across the top to create a “zipper” look.

Cover the pot and put it into the preheated oven bake for 40 minutes.

After 40 minutes, remove the cover, reduce the oven temperature to 220C and bake for another 30 minutes.

Cook on rack completely before slicing.  I waited for 4 hours, as recipe suggest the bread need a longer “setting” time due to its higher hydration.

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Natural Starter Milk Loaf

Natual Starter Milk Loaf // Mono + Co Natual Starter Milk Loaf // Mono + Co Natual Starter Milk Loaf // Mono + Co

After mixing a dough for sourdough country dough meant for an overnight fermentation, I fed my balance starter with another 50g water and 50g flour, only to find it rise to double its height again in 3 hours.  Unable to resist the temptation to bake another loaf with such active starter, I went for a softer milk loaf recipe instead.  Recipe largely adapted from this one, minus the taro, added more milk.


Natural Starter Milk Loaf

120g fed starter
165g fresh milk
240g flour
1 tablespoon milk powder
2 tablespoon raw sugar
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
20g cold butter, cubed

In a mixer bowl, add starter and milk, stir to mix well.  Next, add flour, milk powder, sugar and turn on the mixer on its lowest speed to knead with a dough hook until all the ingredients come together into a ball.  Leave this aside for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, sprinkle salt and run the mixer again to knead the dough for 1 minute.

Add cold butter cube by cube and knead until the dough reaches window pane stage. Stop mixer and leave the dough to bulk rise at room temperature for 180 minutes.

After the dough has risen to expand its volume, punch down the dough to deflate and transfer to a clean work top.  Sprinkle worktop and palms with some flour if the dough is too sticky to handle.  shape the dough into a roll that fits the tin, and place it inside, seam side downwards.  Proof for another 90 minutes.

Bake in a preheated oven at 200C for 20 minutes.  Remove bread from tin immediately after baking and cool completely on a rack before slicing or serving.  I brush the top crust with butter to make it softer after cooling down.

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